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The Australian National University

Facility Upgrade Launched

Announced: Thursday 10 July 2014
Facility Upgrade Launched

ANU Vice CHancellor Prof. Ian Young speaks at the Launch of the EIF Upgrade of the APFRF and the Fusion Science Strategy "Powering Ahead" - credit http://www.bernhardseiwald.com/

The completion of the Infrastructure Upgrade of the Australian Plasma Fusion Research Facility was launched at the ANU today. The Facility is the foundation of Australia's fusion science experimental activity.

 The Facility comprises Australia's only toroidal magnetic fusion experiment, H-1, and a plasma-materials machine, MAGPIE. The H-1 heliac, a stellarator, forms a complex 3D helical “magnetic bottle” in which to study hot plasmas, the fourth state of matter.   

 A five year plan will also be released identifying how Australia could engage with ITER, the next step fusion experiment, under construction in France.

 Fusion is the process that powers the Sun and the stars. If harnessed on Earth, it could provide millions of years of greenhouse gas-free, safe, base-load power.”, said Dr Adi Paterson, CEO of ANSTO.

The Facility comprises Australia's only toroidal magnetic fusion experiment, H-1, and a plasma-materials machine, MAGPIE. The H-1 heliac, a stellarator, forms a complex 3D helical “magnetic bottle” in which to study hot plasmas, the fourth state of matter.

With EIF funding, the H-1 heliac now has state-of-the-art heating, power and diagnostic systems. “These systems provide the platform for new research in basic plasma science, plasma technology and confinement physics” adds Prof. John Howard, Director of the Facility.

MagPIE, an experiment funded in part by ANSTO, enables scientists to study the interactions of hot plasma and advanced material surfaces. Dr  Paterson explains “Power plant fusion plasmas present an extreme materials challenge, the plasma shield to withstand enormous neutron and heat flux damage. This Facility enables us to test prototype new materials in a plasma environment, complementing ANSTO irradiation facilities.”

Senator Zed Seselja pressed the button to initiate a 30,000 degrees Celsius fusion experiment in H1 to conclude the launch.“This facility and its fine team have a reputation for world-class innovation and research excellence,” Senator Seselja said.

Senator Zed Seselja pressed the button to initiate a 30,000 degrees Celsius fusion experiment in H1 to conclude the launch.“This facility and its fine team have a reputation for world-class innovation and research excellence,” Senator Seselja said.

A five year plan will also be released identifying how Australia could engage with ITER, the next step fusion experiment. ITER, under construction in France, is the world's largest science experiment, and is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power. The plan outlines participation with the ITER research community, strengthening Australian capability and infrastructure in fusion science, and development of a diagnostic for ITER.


Updated:  15 October 2014/Responsible Officer:  H-1 Facility Manager /Page Contact:  H-1 Website Administrator