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The Australian National University
FUSION À LA PROVENÇALE
FUSION À LA PROVENÇALE

FUSION À LA PROVENÇALE

Director's Colloquium by Dr. David Campbell, ITER, "FUSION À LA PROVENÇALE - Progress towards fusion energy at ITER"
12:00pm Thursday 31 July, 
Leonard Huxley Lecture Theatre, Building 56, Mills Road


Progress towards fusion energy at ITE"

 

 

 


 

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Facility Upgrade Launched
Facility Upgrade Launched

Facility Upgrade Launched

The completion of the EIF Infrastructure Upgrade of the Australian Plasma Fusion Research Facility was launched at the ANU today. The Facility is the foundation of Australia's fusion science experimental activity.  

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First plasma achieved in the Materials Diagnostic Facility
First plasma achieved in the Materials Diagnostic Facility

First plasma achieved in the Materials Diagnostic Facility

First plasma in the Materials Diagnostic Facility was achieved in late March using argon as the fill gas.

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Fusion Strategic Plan Released
Fusion Strategic Plan Released

Fusion Strategic Plan Released

A five year plan was released today identifying how Australia could engage with ITER, the next step fusion experiment, under construction in France.   ITER is the world's largest science experiment, and is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power. 

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ANU hosts AIP Congress in Canberra
ANU hosts AIP Congress in Canberra

ANU hosts AIP Congress in Canberra

The Australian Institute of Physics, in association with the Australian Optical Society, invites you to submit an abstract to the 21st biennial Australian Institute of Physics Congress, which will be held at the Australian National University in Canberra in the week December 7-11 in 2014.

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New photos
New photos

New photos

Tim Wetherell and John Wach of the RSPE recently took some new photographs inside H-1.  Tim used a Canon 16mm (effective) wide angle, and John used a small Canon IXUS 100 IS that he could fit into confined spaces.

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First Plasma with Thomson Sources
First Plasma with Thomson Sources

First Plasma with Thomson Sources

The  first major phase of the H-1 upgrade was marked by the creation of an Argon plasma with the new cooled antenna and Thomson radiofrequency sources at 7:30PM on Friday the 9th December, 2011.

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MDF achieves "blue core mode"
MDF achieves "blue core mode"

MDF achieves "blue core mode"

On Friday 8th July, we achieved a type of helicon discharge known as 'blue core' mode in which the argon ion light (480nm) dominates the emission at the centre.

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APFRF Future Fellow featured in The Australian Higher Education Supplement
APFRF Future Fellow featured in The Australian Higher Education Supplement

APFRF Future Fellow featured in The Australian Higher Education Supplement

Dr Cormac Corr featured in article on research funding in The Australian newspaper's Higher Education Supplement on 24 April 2013.

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ANSTO CEO Paterson visits ITER
ANSTO CEO Paterson visits ITER

ANSTO CEO Paterson visits ITER

Adi Paterson, the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), visited ITER to continue discussions to help define and implement a coherent strategy for Australian engagment in ITER.

see http://www.iter.org/newsline/259/1520

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The Australian Plasma Fusion Research Facility (APFRF, formerly the National Plasma Fusion Research Facility) is a uniquely versatile plasma research facility, located in the Research School of Physics and Engineering within the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. The H-1 heliac is the Australian focus of basic experimental research on magnetically confined plasma, important in developing fusion energy, a clean, virtually inexhaustible energy source that powers the sun and stars. H-1 is capable of accessing a wide range of plasma configurations or shapes, and utilising the associated state-of-the-art power and measurement systems that allow fundamental studies of plasma, the fourth state of matter. In 2009, under the Australian Government's Super Science Initiative, $7 million was allocated to upgrade the Facility.

Plasma – ionised gas – makes up 99% of the visible universe, and plasma phenomena are important in everything from stars and space exploration to the processing of electronic materials.

Plasma physics is thus a highly interdisciplinary endeavour because of the range of physics areas it encompasses (fluid, atomic, electromagnetic, optical and surface physics) and the diverse technologies employed in plasma experiments (electronics, radio-frequency technologies, magnetics, lasers, microwaves and spectroscopy).

The facility was developed from the ‘H-1 Heliac’ toroidal stellarator experiment in the Research School of Physics and Engineering at the Australian National University. The innovative plasma geometry and unique flexibility of the heliac allows investigation of basic plasma physics, and exploration of ideas for improved design of the fusion power stations that will follow the ITER international fusion experiment.

H1 TFC below angle

The objectives of this facility are to provide:

  • an experimental facility with which Australian scientists, technologists and engineers can contribute to the world-wide effort to develop fusion as a future source of energy
  • opportunities for advanced research training for students of science and technology
  • a platform for the development of novel technological ideas that can be spun off for industrial use.

Updated:  18 October 2014/Responsible Officer:  H-1 Facility Manager /Page Contact:  H-1 Website Administrator